Watermelon rind achaari
Watermelon rind achaari

I’m not sure how many of us even care to cook watermelon rind. I remember mom often making this sabzi during the summers, since there was an abundance of melons at our place. Mom usually cooked it using whole black gram as texture, like many Bengali vegetable dishes stamped as a ‘chokka’ or ‘daalna’. This achari however is inspired by the Nepali cucumber achar/pickle taking the combination flavours from the key ingredients of sesame, cumin and schezwan peppers (which the Nepalese call Timur).

Ingredients: (for 2 servings)

  • Watermelon rind: from 1/4 of a melon
  • Cumin seeds: 1 tsp
  • Schezwan peppers: 1/2 tsp
  • Sesame seeds: 1 tsp
  • Ginger: grated, 1 tsp
  • Green chilly; 1 whole
  • Roasted Peanuts: 1 tbsp
  • Salt to taste

Method:

  • Chop the rind into 1/2 inch long sticks (or cubes)
  • Rub them with some salt and set aside
  • Lightly roast the cumin, peppers and sesame seeds and coarsely dry grind them
  • Heat a tsp of oil in a pan and add the roasted spices
  • Squeeze the watermelon rind and add them to the pan \Add the grated ginger, season with salt, add a little water, cover and simmer till done (about 10-15 mins).
  • Add in the roasted peanuts in the last few minutes of cooking.

It tastes pretty good and light on the stomach, goes well with roti and a bit of curd on the side, or with daal and rice. If you’re reading this, I hope you will think twice before throwing away those rinds. They could prove a boon on a hot humid day when you’re kitchen is running lean and you’re in no mood to head out shopping.

Watermelon rind achaari
Watermelon rind achaari

It tastes pretty good and light on the stomach, goes well with roti and a
bit of curd on the side, or with daal and rice. If you’re reading this, I
hope you will think twice before throwing away those rinds. They could
prove a boon on a hot humid day when you’re kitchen is running lean and
you’re in no mood to head out shopping.

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